Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

July 12, 2024
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Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

Navy’s Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

On April 4th, 2023, Navy head José Rafael Ojeda Durán presented the 2023 Sargassum Operation plan, which detailed the progress and plans for addressing the ongoing issue of sargassum seaweed accumulation along the Quintana Roo coast. This issue has been a persistent problem in recent years, causing environmental and economic damage to the region.

According to Durán, the 2023 plan has seen the installation of 9,050 meters of anti-sargassum barriers along the coast. These barriers are designed to prevent the seaweed from reaching the shore and causing further damage. Durán provided a breakdown of the installation, revealing that 1,850 meters of barriers were installed in Othón P. Blanco (Chetumal, Mahahual), 2,400 meters in Puerto Morelos, 2,500 meters in Solidaridad (Playa del Carmen, Puerto Aventuras) and 2,300 in Tulum. These locations were chosen based on previous sargassum accumulation patterns and the potential for damage.

Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

In addition to the barriers, Durán reported that 328 people and 16 small boats are actively involved in the sargassum removal work being carried out off the Quintana Roo coast. This is a significant effort to address the issue, highlighting the Navy’s commitment to protecting the region’s environment and economy. Durán also noted that 11 sargasso vessels have been deployed to assist in the at-sea collection, further increasing the Navy’s capacity to manage the situation.

The Navy’s sargassum vessels have been strategically distributed to maximize their effectiveness. Durán reported that two sargasso vessels are stationed in Cancun, one in Isla Mujeres, three in Othón P. Blanco, two in Puerto Morelos, two in Solidaridad, and one in Tulum. These vessels are equipped with specialized technology and machinery to collect and transport the seaweed to shore, where it can be properly disposed of.

Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

This year’s plan represents a significant increase in the Navy’s efforts to address the sargassum problem in Quintana Roo. The use of anti-sargassum barriers and the deployment of sargasso vessels highlight the Navy’s commitment to finding sustainable solutions to this ongoing issue. However, it is important to note that this problem is not exclusive to Quintana Roo, and efforts to address it must be coordinated at the national and international level.

Sargassum seaweed is a natural occurrence that has been exacerbated by climate change and other environmental factors. The seaweed provides an important habitat for marine life and plays a role in regulating the ocean’s chemistry. However, the accumulation of large amounts of seaweed on the coast can have detrimental effects on the environment and local economies.

In addition to causing beach erosion and water quality issues, sargassum can also impact tourism and fishing industries. The odor and appearance of the seaweed can be unappealing to tourists, leading to a decrease in visits to the region. Similarly, the accumulation of seaweed in fishing grounds can make it difficult for fishermen to operate, potentially leading to economic losses.

Navy's Anti-Sargassum Barrier Installation Protects State Coastlines with 9,000+ Meters of Coverage

Efforts to address the sargassum problem must take into account the environmental and economic implications of the issue. While the Navy’s plan represents a significant step forward, it is important to continue exploring innovative and sustainable solutions to this ongoing issue. This may include further investment in research and development, as well as greater cooperation between governments, NGOs, and other stakeholders.

In conclusion, the Navy’s 2023 Sargassum Operation plan represents a significant effort to address the ongoing issue of sargassum seaweed accumulation along the Quintana Roo coast. The use of anti-sargassum barriers, sargasso

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